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JAG offers three program applications of its highly successful JAG Model. The program applications are focused on three distinctive audiences:

  • Seniors only are served in the School-to-Career Program Application.  Students are targeted in the 12th grade because it is believed that they will be unable to overcome academic, economic, family or personal barriers.  The Advisory Committee is responsible for identifying barriers that are likely to jeopardize completion of a high school diploma even in the final year of high school or prohibit a successful transition from school to the workplace.

  • Students in grades 9 through 12 are served in the Multi-Year Program Application (referred to as the Multi-Year Program since participants participate in two or more years).

  • Young people (ages 15 to 21) that dropped out of high school or enrolled in an alternative school are served in the Out-of-School Program Application (referred to as the Out-of-School Program).

Other differences in the three program applications include:

  • Program Focus.  The focus in Multi-Year Programs is on retention- keeping the young person in school through graduation. 

    The School-to-Career Program focuses on graduation (first), then, a positive destination (job, education and/or military). 

    The Out-of-School Program focuses on completion of a GED (or a high school diploma), then, a positive destination.

  • Selection Criteria.  School-to-Career Programs serve seniors that are at-risk of graduating from high school or transitioning successfully from school to a career (either through an entry-level job and/or pursuing a postsecondary education or training). 

    Multi-Year Programs serve young people who are likely to drop out of school before graduation.  Research indicates that it is best to identify potential dropouts in the 8th grade, then, launch Multi-Year Program services at the beginning of the 9th grade or in the summer between the 8th and 9th grades.  The young people served in Multi-Year Programs should possess more barriers to success (on average) than seniors in School-to-Career Programs.

    The primary criteria for selection for the Out-of-School Program is separation from the traditional school system or enrollment in an alternative school.

  • Age.  School-to-Career Programs serve seniors only; Multi-Year Programs serve students in the 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grades.  Out-of-School Programs serve young people 15 to 21 years of age.

  • Curriculum - Number of competencies to be completed.  The JAG National Curriculum is delivered through eighty-one (81) modules.  All program applications are expected to complete the thirty-seven (37) core competencies.   The core competencies can be completed in 60 to 100 hours of classroom contact.

    Multi-Year Programs provide a maximum of four years of contact (180 maximum contact hours per year) or 720 hours.  JAG programs should review the 81 competencies and determine the sequence in delivering the competencies over the multi-year period.  Some competencies are never delivered due to time constraints. 

    In the Multi-Year Program Application (9th through the 12th grades), Specialists are capable of delivering the maximum number of competencies (assuming that the average contact per year reaches 100-180 hours).

  • Student-led Organization.  The Career Association is used in the School-to-Career Program as preparation for the demands of the workplace - especially work teams.  Specialists are provided unique opportunities to observe program participants in "work teams" (called a chapter, committee, or task forces) and offer guidance and instruction to improve individual and group performance. 

    In the Multi-Year Program, the Career Association offers unique instructional tools to achieve the following developmental goals: 

    • developing a sense of belonging (to the chapter);
    • enhancing self-esteem (through leadership and recognition activities);
    • focusing on others (not just self);
    • developing a sense of urgency (timing is everything);
    • developing, practicing and refining personal and leadership skills that will enhance career entry and advancement;
    • building pride by associating with a program, a student-led Career Association, and the work place.


    In the Out-of-School Program, the participant-led activities are called The Professional Association.  Out-of-school participants receive the same benefits through The Professional Association as in-school participants receive in Career Association activities.

  • Employer Marketing, Job Development and Placement.  The Senior and Out-of-School Program Applications require:

    • intense and continuous emphasis on marketing the program and completers to employers
    • developing work-based learning experiences (not just jobs), placing completers in quality jobs
    • following up with employers to encourage status changes (e.g. increased wages or hours). 


    The Multi-Year Program uses work experience as a vehicle for staying in contact with potential dropouts in the summer or during holidays.  Research indicates that when a potential dropout is out of school for an extended period of time, there is a greater likelihood for the student not to return to school. 

    In all program applications, the focus should be on an entry-level job leading to a career upon completion of a high school diploma or a GED.


A Comparative Profile

Program Characteristics

In-School Participants

Out-of-School Participants

School-to-Career Program

Multi-Year Program
Out-of-School Program

1. Primary Focus

School-to-Career Transition; High School Graduation; Entry Level Job Leading to a Career

Dropout Prevention; Stay in School; Remediation; High School Graduation; Entry Level Job Leading to a Career

Dropout Recovery; Remediation; Leading to Graduation or GED; Entry Level Job Leading to a Career

2. Intervention

21 months

30 to 48 months

6 to 48 months

3. Number of Participants

35-45

35-45

45-60

4. Competency Attainment

37

37

37

5. Contact Hours

60 to 180 (per year)

80 to 180(per year)

60 to 90 (per year)

6. Contact Format

  • Unscheduled
  • Pullout
  • Scheduled
  •   with credit (preferred)
  • Unscheduled
  • Pullout
  • Scheduled
  •   with credit (preferred)
  • Unscheduled
  • Pullout
  • Scheduled
  •   with credit (preferred)

7. Verification of Barriers

Barriers identified on Student Profile; Advisory Committee approves Program Roster

Barriers identified on Student Profile; Advisory Committee approves Program Roster

Must have left the school system and/or have approval by the high school principal to participate in an Alternative School Program; Program Roster approved by Advisory Committee

8. Process Achievements

  • Selection
  • Competency
  • Completion
  • Career
  • Association
  • Work-Based
  • Learning
  • Postsecondary
  • Education
  • Non-Graduate
  • Recovery
  • Change in Status
  • Average Wage
  • Selection
  • Competency
  • Completion
  • Career
  • Association
  • Work-Based
  • Learning
  • Postsecondary
  • Education
  • Non-Graduate
  • Recovery
  • Change in Status
  • Average Wage
  • Selection
  • Competency
  • Completion
  • Career
  • Association
  • Work-Based
  • Learning
  • Postsecondary
  • Education
  • Non-Graduate
  • Recovery
  • Change in Status
  • Average Wage

9. Performance Outcomes (Results)

  • Return to School after holidays and other breaks
  • Graduation Rate
  • Positive
  • Outcomes Rate
  • Placement Rate
  • Full-time Jobs Rate
  • Full-time Placement Rate
  • Return to School after holidays and other breaks
  • Graduation Rate
  • Positive
  • Outcomes Rate
  • Placement Rate
  • Full-time Jobs Rate
  • Full-time Placement Rate
  • Return to School after holidays and other breaks
  • Graduation Rate
  • Positive
  • Outcomes Rate
  • Placement Rate
  • Full-time Jobs Rate
  • Full-time Placement Rate

10. School Agreement

Yes, basic agreement between school and state to assure full implementation of the JAG Model

Yes, basic agreement between school and state to assure full implementation of the JAG Model

Yes, basic agreement between school and state to assure full implementation of the JAG Model

11. Advisory Committee

Yes, approve Program Roster

Yes, approve Program Roster

Yes, approve Program Roster

12. Specialist  Skills

.Instructor

1 to 3 periods
1 to 3 periods
Flexible

.Counseling

Career and Academic
Career and Academic
Career and Academic

. Job Development

Extensive
Extensive
Extensive

. Follow-up

12 months

12 months

12 months

.Remediation

Yes
Yes
Yes

. Career Placement

Significant time commitment

Significant time commitment

Significant time   commitment

13. Career Association Chapter (Local)

Integrated into the instructional program; competency-based activities; student-led and high level involvement.

Integrated into instructional program; competency-based activities; student-led and high level of involvement; self-esteem and confidence building are crucial outcomes.

The Professional Association is organized like a professional organization in which the focus is on personal and professional development. 

14. Career Association (State)

The capstone experience in leadership development and recognition of student attainment of JAG competencies through competitive events and other demonstrations.

The capstone experience in leadership development and recognition of student attainment of JAG competencies through competitive events and other demonstrations.

State competitions are optional; however, local Professional Association chapter activities are strongly encouraged; the determining issue is whether the dropouts are older, have children, or are employed.

15. Management and Supervision

Because of the age of the student and school involvement, there should be close scrutiny; reporting can be kept to a minimum through regular documentation and oversight; parents expected to sign commitment form.

Supervised similar to the senior program; special attention given to younger students; parents expected to sign commitment form.

Flexibility is the key word.  This is required to help the specialist deal with the student's individual problems. Given the age and maturity of the dropout, more latitude can be provided in the program review and oversight.

16. Model Books

Specialist Handbook Career Association Handbooks

Specialist Handbook Career Association Handbooks

Specialist Handbook Career Association Handbooks

17. Contract

12 month contract

12 month contract

12 month contract

18. Work-Based Learning

Classroom should feature guest speakers; job shadowing should be encouraged; part-time employment provided on an individual needs basis; WBL occurs after graduation but could start earlier if academics are not impacted negatively.

Classroom should feature guest speakers; job shadowing should be encouraged; part-time employment provided in the summers between school years; WBL occurs after graduation but could start earlier if academics are not impacted negatively.

The immediacy of the dropout's problems requires that work be used  throughout the program and continue after program completion.

19. Follow-Up Services

12 months post- graduation; follow-up services are more comprehensive than "checking" outcomes.

12 months post-graduation; follow-up services are more comprehensive than "checking" outcomes.

12 months post-program completion; follow-up services are more comprehensive than "checking" outcomes.

20. Occupational Training

Encouraged but difficult due to last year of enrollment.

Strongly encouraged due to the number of years remaining in high school.

Strong encouragement to take occupational specific training.

21. Postsecondary Education

Strongly encouraged if appropriate.

Strongly encouraged if appropriate.

Dropouts seem open to continued education.

22. Procedures

Recruited in 11th grade; students attend class in 12th grade using scheduled time; thirty-seven competencies are attained; active local career association chapter; graduation is a key outcome; post high school destinations are critical to program success

Additional training and preparation; students are recruited in 8th, 9th or 10th grades; receive training in the 10th, 11th and/or 12th grades using scheduled time; 37 competencies are attained plus other competencies of JAG's 81; active local career association chapter; staying in school through graduation; destinations are critical to success

Students are recruited because they are a dropout; the 37 competencies are attained; assistance provided in acquiring occupational specific skills; active Professional Association chapter; complete high school diploma or GED; GED, participants are assisted in job placement

23.  Accountability

Must be highly committed and accountable to achieve the desired outcomes - complete requirements for a high school diploma and enter the workforce with or without a postsecondary education or other training

Must be highly committed and accountable to achieve the desired outcomes - stay in school through graduation and enter the workforce with or without a postsecondary education or other training

Must be highly committed and accountable to achieve the desired outcomes - complete a high school diploma or a GED and enter the workforce with or without a postsecondary education or other training

24. Documentation-Electronic

National Data Management System

National Data Management System

National Data Management System


Download the Program Applications Comparison in PDF


 
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